News Archive

 


May 1st 2015

Successful completion of Ocean Glider mission

CarICOOS, in collaboration with NOAA AOML, has successfully recovered two ocean gliders (a type of autonomous underwater vehicle or AUV) off the south coast of Puerto Rico after an extended mission in the Caribbean Sea. The oceanographic sections obtained by the vehicle will be used to refine predictions of hurricane intensity. Visual representations of the sections in addition to the underlying data are available at http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/phod/goos/gliders/observations.php

 

 

 

 


April 27, 2014

Buoys are back!  Ready for the 2015 Hurricane Season

The annually scheduled maintenance operations for the St. John, San Juan and Vieques buoys have been completed and data can already be accessed at CariCOOS.org. 

  

 

CariCOOS data buoys (GoMOOS-type buoys) are serviced yearly and refurbished by its fabricators from the Physical Oceanography group of the University of Maine led by Dr. Neal Pettigrew. This maintenance is scheduled to ensure it’s timely completion before the hurricane season that officially begins June 1. This major operation is supported by the CariCOOS Field Team and Commercial Divers Inc ®.

 January 26, 2015

Excellence in Poster Presentation Award at the APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics

CariCOOS congratulates Dr. Aponte's student Jaynise Perez for receiving the "Excellence in Poster Presentation" Award at the APS Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics. Her poster "CariCOOS Real-Time Data Validation of High-Resolution WRF Model" was presented this past weekend at Rutgers University.

Jaynise M. Perez and her poster CariCOOS Real-Time Data Validation of High-Resolution WRF Model

Jaynise in Rutgers

Poster Awards in the American Physical Society's Conference for Undergraduate Women in Physics

 


  September 30, 2014

 

 

University of the Virgin Islands 1st CaRA Teachers Workshop

 

 

The Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing (CaRA) held a teachers workshop at the University of the Virgin Islands’ Marine Science Center on September 13, 2014.  The workshop was attended by teachers from various schools (both public and private) on the island of St. Thomas eager to learn more about CaRA/CariCOOS and its potential applications in the classroom setting. Dr. Yasmin Detres (CariCOOS Education & Outreach Coordinator, UPR) led the workshop by first introducing participants to the Caribbean Integrated Ocean Observing System, and to the CariCOOS ocean observing assets and website. Teachers were able to access information about each data buoy currently deployed, observe real time data on wind/waves, as well as monitor coastal weather models. A tutorial was also presented demonstrating classroom modules and activities that the teachers could incorporate into their lessons such as explaining what waves are and how to calculate wind speed; a great hands-on activity to get students involved!  The afternoon portion of the workshop included a hands-on field trip on one of the UVI’s research boats.  Vanessa Wright (oceanographic technician, UVI) and Paul Jobsis (Director of the Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, UVI) demonstrated the use and application of various oceanographic tools and instruments including a Secchi disk, Niskin bottle, water quality meter, and plankton net.  All of the teachers took home a copy of the Coastal Climates of our Islands educational module to incorporate these lessons into the classroom.  The event was very successful and we plan to follow up soon with all of the teachers to see how each of them used the information they learned during the workshop and how they brought the material into their classroom setting.

 

 

 

 

Figure 1. Dr. Yasmin Detres introducing CariCOOS to all of the participants.

 

 

Figure 2. Dr. Yasmin Detres working with the teachers as they begin the teacher’s data exploration portion of the workshop.

 

 

 

Figure 3. Vanessa Wright demonstrating the Secchi disk to workshop participants.
 

 

 

Figure 4. Group photo of all the teachers’ workshop participants with Yasmin Detres (CariCOOS Education & Outreach Coordinator, UPR), Vanessa Wright (Oceanographic Technician, UVI), Paul Jobsis (Director of Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, UVI), and Howard Forbes Jr. (Virgin Islands Marine Advisory Service (VIMAS) Coordinator, UVI).

 


June 10, 2014

Mona Island Sentry Experiment 2014

Rutgers University and the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS) conducted their second High Frequency Radar Experiment in the Mona Passage as part of the Department of Homeland Security National Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce. Specific goals of the SENTRY experiment were to evaluate the

1) capability to provide data to federal and state law enforcement agencies

2) identify different types and sizes of vessels being detected,

3) processing for joint detections by two radars (a new capability) as well as association of vessel positions. 

The team installed and tested a 13 MHz bistatic transmitter from the cliffs of Mona Island and aboard the M/V Mariangie. Different deployment configurations were tested to determine which were optimal for increased radar coverage.  The signal from the transmitter was received by two SeaSonde HF radar stations deployed on the west coast of Puerto Rico. The 2014 experiment focused on detecting vessels that were visible to both radars simultaneously.  The real time vessel detection software was operated on each of the two radars in Puerto Rico and the vessel detection data was mapped in real time and provided to the Coast Guard for use in the security exercise.  Data will be further analyzed during the coming weeks to determine the types of vessels the radar is detecting.  We will also take advantage of any detection opportunities the Coast Guard can provide by running their cutters through the coverage area of the radars. 

 We would like to thank the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources for assisting with the site selection and logistic of operations on Mona Island.

 See pictures at:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rutgers_cool/sets/72157645092525005/


June 9, 2014

University of the Virgin Islands Presents CariCOOS Data buoy research at the national Ocean Sciences Meeting Held in Honolulu, Hawaii

The Ocean Sciences Meeting 2014 was held in Honolulu, Hawaii and University of the Virgin Islands Oceanographic technician, Vanessa Wright, presented a poster titled “Observations Of a Tropical Ecosystem: An Evaluation Of Spatial Variability In Ocean Measurements To Build An Effective Regional Coastal Ocean Observing System”. The poster evaluated the spatial variability between the St. Thomas and St. John, USVI CariCOOS data buoys to access site redundancy and determine areas of interest to support stakeholder’s needs. The results showed variability in ocean currents between the two locations and no significant variability in meteorological data between the two locations. Future work will be performed to investigate further oceanographic differences between sites. The resulting stakeholders needs include real time measurements on the north side of the US Virgin Islands. At this time there is not a data buoy located in the north in the Atlantic, however one immediate way to get this information is by creating a virtual buoy at that location which will be implemented soon and available on the CariCOOS website (CariCOOS.org

 


 

June 9, 2014

CariCOOS signed memorandum of agreement with the San Juan Bay Estuary Program

The Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS) recently signed a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the San Juan Bay Estuary (SJBE) Program to share information, participate in the SJBE restoration and conservation efforts and to create awareness of the estuarine ecosystem’s importance. The San Juan Bay Estuary Program was created after designation of this estuary system, in 1992, as a resource of national importance by the Environmental Protection Agency. This estuary is the only tropical estuary and the only estuary outside the continental United States in the National Estuary Program (NEP). As part of the agreement CariCOOS will provide data products from observational assets, model simulations and operational support to facilitate access to waves, wind, currents, tide, salinity and temperature information. This agreement will indeed promote increased collaboration and communication between the Programs in their efforts to protect this valuable ecosystem.

 

 

  


 June 9, 2014

Dr. Yasmín Detrés gives invited talk at the Institute of Caribbean Studies

 Dr. Yasmín Detrés was invited speaker at the University Of Puerto Rico Institute of Caribbean Studies on April 24, 2014. The conference entitled “Transport and deposition of Saharan Dust in the Caribbean Region: Implications for climate and health” was part of the 2014 Caribbean Lectures Series aimed to disseminate Caribbean studies in diverse disciplines. Aspects such as key findings of the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences sponsored AERosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE), characteristics of the dust transported to the Caribbean, and overall effects to health and climate, were presented in her talk. Professor Dr. Maritza Barreto (Department of Geography, School of Social Sciences, UPR-RP) commented the lecture emphasizing on the effects of Saharan dust on social and cultural aspects in the Caribbean. This conference was broadcasted live online and is now available at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/46641983, http://goo.gl/y4XHHl). The presentation has been successfully hit by over 580 computers from diverse countries.


May 9, 2014

6th CaRA/CariCOOS General Assembly marked by success

The Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing CaRA held its 6th General Assembly on March 13, 2014 at the Club Naútico de San Juan. More than 100 Stakeholders representing diverse sectors attended the event aimed at informing all interested parties about the status, advances and new initiatives of the Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS).  Introductory remarks in charge of the CaRA Council Chairman, Dr. Jorge Corredor, were followed by presentations addressing program advances, new projects and proposed workplan by Prof. Julio Morell, CaRA/CariCOOS Executive director and Dr. Miguel Canals, Associate Director. Presentations by Dr. Paul Jobsis (University of the Virgin Islands), Mr. Carl Gouldman (National IOOS office representative), and Dr. Yasmín Detrés (CariCOOS Education & Outreach Coordinator) further informed participants of CariCOOS and IOOS activities and outlook. Interactive exhibits and a comprehensive poster session showcased the most relevant CariCOOS projects and collaborations.

The highlight of the activity was the presentation and signature of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Puerto Rico Emergency Management Agency (PREMA) and CaRA by their respective program directors Miguel A. Rios and Julio Morell. This MoU formalizes the use of information products developed by CariCOOS on the part of PREMA as unique and valuable instruments for disaster planning and response, at municipal and state levels.  Moreover, by this agreement, PREMA adopts the Beach and Surfzone Current Warning System, developed as collaborative effort between CariCOOS and the University of Puerto Rico Sea Grant Program, as an operational product for drowning prevention.

  

 

 

Fig. 1 - Stakeholders from the academic, government (State and Federal), Non-Governmental Organizations, recreational and private sectors attended the 6th CaRA General Assembly.

 

Fig. 2 - MoU signature by Miguel A. Ríos (Director, PREMA) and Julio M. Morell (Executive  Director, CaRA).

 

 

Fig. 3- Recognized stakeholders (left to right): Captain David Flaherty (USCG), Edwin Font (commercial fisherman), Roberto García (NWS), Captain Alex Cruz (Caribbean Harbor Pilots), Roberto Cortés (Telemundo TV, PR), and Ernesto Díaz (DNER CZMP).


 

May 1, 2014

CariCOOS Data Buoys Undergoing Yearly Maintenance

PR1 Ponce, PR2 San Juan,  PR3 Vieques and VI1 St. John has been removed  for yearly maintenance. We anticipate 2-3 weeks downtime.  We will notify when this operation is completed.

 


 

The CariCOOS High-Resolution Nearshore Wave Model reaches one year of continuous operations

 

The CariCOOS High-Resolution Nearshore Wave Model was officially launched in October 2012 and has recently reached one year of operational status, a significant milestone of the CariCOOS nearshore modeling efforts. Our wave model has attained a 99.3% availability level during its first year of operation. This very high-resolution operational wave model includes "nested grids" at a spatial resolution ranging from 1.1 km to 60 meters that allow visualization of nearshore wave details in selected sub-regions (see map below). An evaluation of model performance using our buoy network has shown a significant improvement over forecasts based on NOAA's WW3, the model currently in use by the National Weather Service for our region. The CariCOOS model is forced by WW3 spectral data at the boundaries and the wind forcing is based on NWS NDFD data; the best wind model currently available. In addition to our sub-regional model runs we have recently developed very high resolution model domains for San Juan Bay and the coastal beach town of Rincon.

 

 

 

El Modelo CariCOOS de Olas Costeras de Alta Resolución cumple un año de operación continua

 

El modelo CariCOOS de olas costeras de alta resolución fue lanzado oficialmente en octubre de 2012 y ha llegado recientemente a un año de funcionamiento, un hito importante en los esfuerzos de modelaje costero de CariCOOS. Nuestro modelo de olas ha alcanzado un nivel de disponibilidad del 99,3 % durante el primer año de funcionamiento. Este modelo de olas de muy alta resolución operacional incluye " mallas anidadas " en una resolución espacial que va desde 1.1 km hasta 60 metros que permiten la visualización de detalles del oleaje costero en las subregiones seleccionadas (ver mapa abajo). La evaluación del desempeño del modelo mediante nuestra red de boyas ha demostrado una mejora significativa respecto a los pronósticos basados en "NOAA WW3", el modelo actualmente en uso por el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional para nuestra región. El modelo CarICOOS es forzado por datos espectrales de NOAA WW3 en sus fronteras y el efecto del viento se basa en datos del NWS NDFD; el mejor modelo de viento disponible. Además de las corridas sub-regionales, hemos desarrollado recientemente dominios espaciales de altísima resolución para la Bahía de San Juan y la playa de la ciudad costera de Rincón.

 

 Building regional ocean observing skills through CariCOOS training 

 

 

For the past 5 years CariCOOS had provided students with relevant opportunities to develop regional knowledge in the US Caribbean. Graduate and undergraduate students, mostly from Engineering, Marine Sciences, Physics and Math disciplines, have participated in summer internships and graduate research projects under the mentorship of various program investigators. During this "hands-on" training, students have had the opportunity to work on diverse topics within an interdisciplinary and collaborative environment.  

 

Research topics explored by CariCOOS students include storm surge (Juan Gonzalez and Ernesto Rodriguez), nearshore wave modeling(Carlos Anselmi), ocean acidification (Melissa Melendez), waves hydrodynamics (Andre Amador), coastal morphodynamics (Patricia Chardon), ocean circulation modeling (Edgardo Garcia), rip current numerical modeling (Estefania Quinones), ROMS ocean current simulations (Edward Rivera) and analysis of surface currents using high frequency radars (Luis Pomales).

 

CariCOOS students have proven to be highly competitive.  Some are currently employed at the National Weather Service Forecast Office in San Juan, Puerto Rico, others are in private industry,  and several are  pursuing doctoral degrees in well recognized institutions such as Notre Dame University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, the University of Delaware and Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

In this manner, CariCOOS promotes the development of highly educated and skilled professionals to advance ocean observing efforts in the US Caribbean region.   

  

 

 

 

 

Desarollando destrezas regionales para la observación océanica mediante entrenamiento de CariCOOS

 

Durante los pasados 5 años CariCOOS ha proporcionado importantes oportunidades a estudiantes para desarrollar el conocimiento regional en el Caribe Estadounidense. Estudiantes graduados y subgraduados principalmente de las disciplinas de Ingeniería, Ciencias Marinas, Física y Matemáticas, han participado en ayudantías de verano y proyectos de investigación bajo la tutela de varios investigadores del programa. Durante este entrenamiento interactivo los estudiantes han tenido la oportunidad de trabajar en diversos temas en un ambiente interdisciplinario y colaborativo.

 

Los temas de investigación explorados por los estudiantes de CarICOOS incluyen marejadas ciclónicas (Juan González y Ernesto Rodríguez), modelaje de olas cerca de la costa (Carlos Anselmi), acidificación de los océanos (Melissa Melendez), hidrodinámica de olas (Andre Amador), morfodinámica costera (Patricia Chardón), modelaje de circulación oceánica (Edgardo Garcia) , modelaje numérico de olas de resaca (Estefania Quiñones) , simulaciones de corrientes ROMS ( Eduardo Rivera), y análisis de corrientes superficiales utilizando radares de alta frecuencia (Luis Pomales).

 

Los estudiantes de CariCOOS han demostrado ser muy competitivos. Algunos están actualmente empleados en la Oficina del Servicio Nacional de Meteorologia en San Juan, Puerto Rico, otros están en la industria privada, y varios están completando su doctorado en prestigiosas instituciones tales como la Universidad de Notre Dame en Indiana, el Instituto Scripps de Oceanografía de la Universidad de California en San Diego, la Universidad de Delaware y el Stevens Institute of Technology en New Jersey.

De esta manera, CarICOOS promueve el desarrollo de profesionales altamente preparados y capacitados para avanzar en los esfuerzos de observación de los océanos en la región del Caribe Estadounidense.

CariCOOS support to the Puerto Rico Climate Change Council

 

Reaffirming a commitment of support to the Puerto Rico Climate Change Council (PRCCC), CariCOOS staff attended the recent "IV PRCCC Summit Meeting" in San Juan Puerto Rico on Friday, August 23. CariCOOS researchers have contributed prominently to the productivity of the Council helping lay the groundwork for the recently released report entitled "Estado del Clima de Puerto Rico: Evaluación de vulnerabilidades socio-ecológicas en un clima cambiante", a consensus document detailing current changes, forseen trends, and expected impacts. Professors Julio Morell and Aurelio Mercado, Drs. Miguel Canals, Jorge Capella, Yasmín Detrés and Jorge Corredor and graduate student Melissa Meléndez are co-authors of the document. 

 

Electronic copy of the PRCCC report, as well as further information regarding the PRCCC, are available at:  http://www.drna.gobierno.pr/oficinas/arn/recursosvivientes/costasreservasrefugios/pmzc/prccc/prccc .

     

 

Apoyo de CariCOOS al Consejo de Cambio Climatico de Puerto Rico

 

Reafirmando su compromiso de apoyar al Consejo de Cambio Climático de Puerto Rico (PRCCC), el personal de CariCOOS asistió a la "IV Cumbre de PRCCC" celebrada en San Juan Puerto Rico el viernes 23 de agosto de 2013. Investigadores de CariCOOS han hecho importantes contribuciones a la productividad del Consejo ayudando a establecer las bases para el recientemente publicado informe titulado "Estado del Clima de Puerto Rico: evaluación de vulnerabilidades socio-ecológicas en un clima cambiante", un documento de consenso que detalla los cambios actuales, tendencias previstas, e impactos esperados. Los profesores Julio Morell y Aurelio Mercado, los Doctores Miguel Canals, Jorge Capella, Yasmín Detrés y Jorge Corredor y la estudiante Melissa Meléndez son co-autores del documento.

Copia electrónica del informe PRCCC, así como más información sobre el PRCCC, están disponibles en http://www.drna.gobierno.pr/oficinas/arn/recursosvivientes/costasreservasrefugios/pmzc/prccc/prccc.

 

 


NOAA awards $27.2 million for ocean and coastal observing technology

September 30, 2013

IOOS is a federal, regional, and private-sector partnership working to enhance our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information.

IOOS is a federal, regional, and private-sector partnership working to enhance our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA is awarding $27.2 million to sustain current critical ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes observing efforts and to support innovative marine sensor technologies, with a goal of helping us better understand our coastal and marine environment. The funding is provided through the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®), other federal agencies, and NOAA programs.

“IOOS brings federal and regional ocean observations together to give decision-makers the critical data they need to save lives and build their communities,” said Zdenka Willis, U.S. IOOS program director. “These awards will sustain those observations, and speed the transition of new promising technologies into the ocean, where they can serve our coastal communities day in and day out.”

Highlights of the awards

This year’s awards include $2.9 million for marine sensor innovation projects to enhance our understanding of the coastal and marine environment.  

  • $1 million to the Southeastern Universities Research Association to make operational the U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, an infrastructure for the testing and improvement of non-federal and federal models and prediction tools;

  • $1 million to the Alliance for Coastal Technologies for technology transfer and accelerating development of promising new marine observing technologies;

  • $340,000 provided through the Northeast IOOS Regional Association in support of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and McLane Industries efforts to transition cutting-edge observing platforms monitoring the emergence of harmful algal blooms and improve harmful algal bloom forecasts in the Gulf of Maine;

  • $574,000 to fund projects in five IOOS Western regional associations. These projects will develop ocean acidification sensor technology to support West Coast and Alaska shellfish industry monitoring needs, improve measurements of the state of ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands, and develop workforce capacity to work with ocean acidification sensors.

In addition to the marine sensor innovation projects introduced this year, the U.S. IOOS awarded $24.3 million to sustain critical coastal, ocean, and Great Lakes efforts.  As part of this effort, the U.S. IOOS Program and NASA will continue to jointly fund, at $250,000 each per year, projects to improve satellite sea surface temperature data from existing and new sensors, produce a blended output of sea surface temperature data from U.S. and international datasets, and target these products for coastal applications and regional IOOS usage.

The total breakdown of the $27.2 million is:

  • Alaska Ocean Observing System ($2.2 million)

  • Alliance for Coastal Technologies ($1 million)

  • Caribbean Regional Association ($1.6 million)

  • Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System ($2.3 million)

  • Gulf of Mexico Coastal Observing System ($1.5 million)

  • Great Lakes Observing System ($1.6 million)

  • Mid-Atlantic Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems ($3 million)

  • Multi-sensor Improved Sea Surface Temperature ($500,000)

  • Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems ($3.1 million)

  • Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems ($2.4 million)

  • Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System ($2.2 million)

  • Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System ($2.3 million)

  • Southeastern Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association ($2.5 million)

  • Southeastern Universities Research Association ($1 million)

Funding supports NOAA's efforts to develop a national IOOS for tracking, predicting, managing and adapting to changes in the marine environment. IOOS delivers data and information needed to increase understanding of the Nation’s waters to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect our environment.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and our other social media channels.


 

               NEWSLETTER FALL 2013

 

 
 
 
 
CariCOOS data buoys array is fully operational

 

The CariCOOS data buoy array for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands was enhanced

with the recent deployment of buoy "E" in Vieques Sound, North of Vieques Island (18o15.608'N, 65o27.725'W). This region hosts a large recreational boating community including recreational and commercial vessels, passenger ferries that run between the islands and law enforcement crafts. The buoy measures wave heights, wave direction, wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, salinity, barometric pressure, and ocean currents in Vieques Sound.   

 

CariCOOS buoys located off Ponce, San Juan and St. John USVI are also prepared for another year of service. Buoys were removed from their moorings and re-deployed following maintenance by Commercial Divers Inc. Personnel from the University of Maine Physical Oceanography Group and CariCOOS refurbished all instruments and ground tackle and re-certified the buoys for continued operation.  The Program is very grateful to the Port of Ponce, the PR Ports Authority, and the West Indian Company in St. Thomas USVI for accommodating the buoy operations at their dock space.  

 

Visit CariCOOS.org to access the buoys real time information and forecasts. You can also receive hourly coastal weather information through our Twitter account.  

 

 

 

Red de Boyas CariCOOS instaladas

 

La red de boyas instrumentadas CarICOOS para Puerto Rico y las Islas Vírgenes estadounidenses se expandió con la reciente instalación de la boya "E " en la Sonda de Vieques al norte de la isla de Vieques    (18o15.608 'N, 65o27.725 ' W). Esta región es transitada por una gran cantidad de embarcaciones recreativas y comerciales, ferries de pasajeros que viajan entre las islas y embarcaciones de agencias reguladoras. Esta boya provee información de la altura y dirección de olas, velocidad y dirección del viento, temperatura del aire, salinidad, presión barométrica, y de las corrientes oceánicas en la Sonda de Vieques.

 

Las otras boyas instrumentadas de CariCOOS localizadas al sur de Ponce, San Juan y St. John USVI también están también listas para un año más de servicio. Las boyas fueron removidas y reinstaladas por Commercial Divers Inc. y los instrumentos y equipo de fondo recibieron mantenimiento de parte del personal del Grupo de Oceanografía Física de la Universidad de Maine y de CarICOOS quienes re - certificaron las boyas para continuar su operación. El programa manifiesta por este medio su agradecimiento al Puerto de Ponce, a la Autoridad de los Puertos y a la Compañía de las Indias Occidentales en St. Thomas Islas Vírgenes de EE.UU. por proveer el espacio necesario estos trabajos.  

 

Puedes visitar CariCOOS.org para acceder a la información de las boyas a tiempo real y a los pronósticos de CairCOOS. También puede recibir información del clima costero cada hora a través de nuestra cuenta en Twitter.

 

 

 


 

The CariCOOS High-Resolution Nearshore Wave Model reaches one year of continuous operations

 

The CariCOOS High-Resolution Nearshore Wave Model was officially launched in October 2012 and has recently reached one year of operational status, a significant milestone of the CariCOOS nearshore modeling efforts. Our wave model has attained a 99.3% availability level during its first year of operation. This very high-resolution operational wave model includes "nested grids" at a spatial resolution ranging from 1.1 km to 60 meters that allow visualization of nearshore wave details in selected sub-regions (see map below). An evaluation of model performance using our buoy network has shown a significant improvement over forecasts based on NOAA's WW3, the model currently in use by the National Weather Service for our region. The CariCOOS model is forced by WW3 spectral data at the boundaries and the wind forcing is based on NWS NDFD data; the best wind model currently available. In addition to our sub-regional model runs we have recently developed very high resolution model domains for San Juan Bay and the coastal beach town of Rincon.

 

 

 

El Modelo CariCOOS de Olas Costeras de Alta Resolución cumple un año de operación continua

 

El modelo CariCOOS de olas costeras de alta resolución fue lanzado oficialmente en octubre de 2012 y ha llegado recientemente a un año de funcionamiento, un hito importante en los esfuerzos de modelaje costero de CariCOOS. Nuestro modelo de olas ha alcanzado un nivel de disponibilidad del 99,3 % durante el primer año de funcionamiento. Este modelo de olas de muy alta resolución operacional incluye " mallas anidadas " en una resolución espacial que va desde 1.1 km hasta 60 metros que permiten la visualización de detalles del oleaje costero en las subregiones seleccionadas (ver mapa abajo). La evaluación del desempeño del modelo mediante nuestra red de boyas ha demostrado una mejora significativa respecto a los pronósticos basados en "NOAA WW3", el modelo actualmente en uso por el Servicio Meteorológico Nacional para nuestra región. El modelo CarICOOS es forzado por datos espectrales de NOAA WW3 en sus fronteras y el efecto del viento se basa en datos del NWS NDFD; el mejor modelo de viento disponible. Además de las corridas sub-regionales, hemos desarrollado recientemente dominios espaciales de altísima resolución para la Bahía de San Juan y la playa de la ciudad costera de Rincón.

 

 Building regional ocean observing skills through CariCOOS training 

 

 

For the past 5 years CariCOOS had provided students with relevant opportunities to develop regional knowledge in the US Caribbean. Graduate and undergraduate students, mostly from Engineering, Marine Sciences, Physics and Math disciplines, have participated in summer internships and graduate research projects under the mentorship of various program investigators. During this "hands-on" training, students have had the opportunity to work on diverse topics within an interdisciplinary and collaborative environment.  

 

Research topics explored by CariCOOS students include storm surge (Juan Gonzalez and Ernesto Rodriguez), nearshore wave modeling(Carlos Anselmi), ocean acidification (Melissa Melendez), waves hydrodynamics (Andre Amador), coastal morphodynamics (Patricia Chardon), ocean circulation modeling (Edgardo Garcia), rip current numerical modeling (Estefania Quinones), ROMS ocean current simulations (Edward Rivera) and analysis of surface currents using high frequency radars (Luis Pomales).

 

CariCOOS students have proven to be highly competitive.  Some are currently employed at the National Weather Service Forecast Office in San Juan, Puerto Rico, others are in private industry,  and several are  pursuing doctoral degrees in well recognized institutions such as Notre Dame University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, the University of Delaware and Stevens Institute of Technology.

 

In this manner, CariCOOS promotes the development of highly educated and skilled professionals to advance ocean observing efforts in the US Caribbean region.   

  

 

 

 

 

Desarollando destrezas regionales para la observación océanica mediante entrenamiento de CariCOOS

 

Durante los pasados 5 años CariCOOS ha proporcionado importantes oportunidades a estudiantes para desarrollar el conocimiento regional en el Caribe Estadounidense. Estudiantes graduados y subgraduados principalmente de las disciplinas de Ingeniería, Ciencias Marinas, Física y Matemáticas, han participado en ayudantías de verano y proyectos de investigación bajo la tutela de varios investigadores del programa. Durante este entrenamiento interactivo los estudiantes han tenido la oportunidad de trabajar en diversos temas en un ambiente interdisciplinario y colaborativo.

 

Los temas de investigación explorados por los estudiantes de CarICOOS incluyen marejadas ciclónicas (Juan González y Ernesto Rodríguez), modelaje de olas cerca de la costa (Carlos Anselmi), acidificación de los océanos (Melissa Melendez), hidrodinámica de olas (Andre Amador), morfodinámica costera (Patricia Chardón), modelaje de circulación oceánica (Edgardo Garcia) , modelaje numérico de olas de resaca (Estefania Quiñones) , simulaciones de corrientes ROMS ( Eduardo Rivera), y análisis de corrientes superficiales utilizando radares de alta frecuencia (Luis Pomales).

 

Los estudiantes de CariCOOS han demostrado ser muy competitivos. Algunos están actualmente empleados en la Oficina del Servicio Nacional de Meteorologia en San Juan, Puerto Rico, otros están en la industria privada, y varios están completando su doctorado en prestigiosas instituciones tales como la Universidad de Notre Dame en Indiana, el Instituto Scripps de Oceanografía de la Universidad de California en San Diego, la Universidad de Delaware y el Stevens Institute of Technology en New Jersey.

De esta manera, CarICOOS promueve el desarrollo de profesionales altamente preparados y capacitados para avanzar en los esfuerzos de observación de los océanos en la región del Caribe Estadounidense.

 

 

 

CariCOOS support to the Puerto Rico Climate Change Council

 

Reaffirming a commitment of support to the Puerto Rico Climate Change Council (PRCCC), CariCOOS staff attended the recent "IV PRCCC Summit Meeting" in San Juan Puerto Rico on Friday, August 23. CariCOOS researchers have contributed prominently to the productivity of the Council helping lay the groundwork for the recently released report entitled "Estado del Clima de Puerto Rico: Evaluación de vulnerabilidades socio-ecológicas en un clima cambiante", a consensus document detailing current changes, forseen trends, and expected impacts. Professors Julio Morell and Aurelio Mercado, Drs. Miguel Canals, Jorge Capella, Yasmín Detrés and Jorge Corredor and graduate student Melissa Meléndez are co-authors of the document. 

 

Electronic copy of the PRCCC report, as well as further information regarding the PRCCC, are available at:  http://www.drna.gobierno.pr/oficinas/arn/recursosvivientes/costasreservasrefugios/pmzc/prccc/prccc .

     

 

Apoyo de CariCOOS al Consejo de Cambio Climatico de Puerto Rico

 

Reafirmando su compromiso de apoyar al Consejo de Cambio Climático de Puerto Rico (PRCCC), el personal de CariCOOS asistió a la "IV Cumbre de PRCCC" celebrada en San Juan Puerto Rico el viernes 23 de agosto de 2013. Investigadores de CariCOOS han hecho importantes contribuciones a la productividad del Consejo ayudando a establecer las bases para el recientemente publicado informe titulado "Estado del Clima de Puerto Rico: evaluación de vulnerabilidades socio-ecológicas en un clima cambiante", un documento de consenso que detalla los cambios actuales, tendencias previstas, e impactos esperados. Los profesores Julio Morell y Aurelio Mercado, los Doctores Miguel Canals, Jorge Capella, Yasmín Detrés y Jorge Corredor y la estudiante Melissa Meléndez son co-autores del documento.

Copia electrónica del informe PRCCC, así como más información sobre el PRCCC, están disponibles en http://www.drna.gobierno.pr/oficinas/arn/recursosvivientes/costasreservasrefugios/pmzc/prccc/prccc.

 


 

NOAA awards $27.2 million for ocean and coastal observing technology

September 30, 2013

IOOS is a federal, regional, and private-sector partnership working to enhance our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information.

IOOS is a federal, regional, and private-sector partnership working to enhance our ability to collect, deliver, and use ocean information.

High resolution (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA is awarding $27.2 million to sustain current critical ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes observing efforts and to support innovative marine sensor technologies, with a goal of helping us better understand our coastal and marine environment. The funding is provided through the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®), other federal agencies, and NOAA programs.

“IOOS brings federal and regional ocean observations together to give decision-makers the critical data they need to save lives and build their communities,” said Zdenka Willis, U.S. IOOS program director. “These awards will sustain those observations, and speed the transition of new promising technologies into the ocean, where they can serve our coastal communities day in and day out.”

Highlights of the awards

This year’s awards include $2.9 million for marine sensor innovation projects to enhance our understanding of the coastal and marine environment.  

  • $1 million to the Southeastern Universities Research Association to make operational the U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, an infrastructure for the testing and improvement of non-federal and federal models and prediction tools;

  • $1 million to the Alliance for Coastal Technologies for technology transfer and accelerating development of promising new marine observing technologies;

  • $340,000 provided through the Northeast IOOS Regional Association in support of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and McLane Industries efforts to transition cutting-edge observing platforms monitoring the emergence of harmful algal blooms and improve harmful algal bloom forecasts in the Gulf of Maine;

  • $574,000 to fund projects in five IOOS Western regional associations. These projects will develop ocean acidification sensor technology to support West Coast and Alaska shellfish industry monitoring needs, improve measurements of the state of ocean acidification in the Pacific Islands, and develop workforce capacity to work with ocean acidification sensors.

In addition to the marine sensor innovation projects introduced this year, the U.S. IOOS awarded $24.3 million to sustain critical coastal, ocean, and Great Lakes efforts.  As part of this effort, the U.S. IOOS Program and NASA will continue to jointly fund, at $250,000 each per year, projects to improve satellite sea surface temperature data from existing and new sensors, produce a blended output of sea surface temperature data from U.S. and international datasets, and target these products for coastal applications and regional IOOS usage.

The total breakdown of the $27.2 million is:

  • Alaska Ocean Observing System ($2.2 million)

  • Alliance for Coastal Technologies ($1 million)

  • Caribbean Regional Association ($1.6 million)

  • Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System ($2.3 million)

  • Gulf of Mexico Coastal Observing System ($1.5 million)

  • Great Lakes Observing System ($1.6 million)

  • Mid-Atlantic Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems ($3 million)

  • Multi-sensor Improved Sea Surface Temperature ($500,000)

  • Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems ($3.1 million)

  • Northeastern Regional Association of Coastal Ocean Observing Systems ($2.4 million)

  • Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System ($2.2 million)

  • Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System ($2.3 million)

  • Southeastern Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association ($2.5 million)

  • Southeastern Universities Research Association ($1 million)

Funding supports NOAA's efforts to develop a national IOOS for tracking, predicting, managing and adapting to changes in the marine environment. IOOS delivers data and information needed to increase understanding of the Nation’s waters to improve safety, enhance the economy, and protect our environment.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and our other social media channels.


 

Sept 11, 2013

CariCOOS launches 5th regional Data Buoy

 CariCOOS data buoy “E” was deployed on September 10 2013 at a point practically equidistant from the islands of Vieques and Culebra and the main island of Puerto Rico (18o 15.608’N 65o 27.725’W). Vieques Sound is characterized by heavy recreational use with numerous pleasure craft traversing these waters, ferries making regular runs between the islands and law enforcement craft. CariCOOS undertook detailed consultations with these sectors as well as with the US Coast Guard to determine optimum location for the buoy to provide accurate and representative data of coastal ocean conditions within the Sound. The buoy measures wave heights, wave direction, wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, salinity, barometric pressure, and ocean currents in Vieques Sound.

 

The deployment completes the CariCOOS buoy array that now consists of four GOMOOS type data buoys (located off San Juan to the north, Ponce to the south and St. John, USVI to the east) one EPSCoR data buoy operated by the University of the Virgin Islands south of St. Thomas, USVI, and one specialized wave buoy off the coast of Rincon, PR in waters of the Mona Passage to the west. The CariCOOS Data buoy array will serve the islands well in monitoring coastal ocean conditions during the hurricane season now under way.

     

 All photos by Efrain Figueroa


 July 31, 2013

Successful Conclusion of the CariCOOS 2013 Summer Internship

CariCOOS 2013summer interns Edward Rivera, Estefanía Quiñones and Luis Pomales.

Undergraduate students Estefanía Quiñones (UPRM, Physics Department), Edward Rivera (UPRM, Mechanical Engineering Department) and Luis Pomales (UPRH, Physics & Electronics Department) successfully concluded their CariCOOS 2013 summer internship. During their internship period (June 3 to July 26, 2013) students worked on specific topics relevant to the observing system mission under the supervision of Dr. Stefano Leonardi, Dr. Miguel Canals and Prof. Julio Morell, CariCOOS Co-PI’s and executive director, respectively. The students enthusiastically presented their work to the CariCOOS team in a seminar held at Isla Magueyes Field Station on August 2, 2013.  - click here for abstracts-


May 24, 2013

CariCOOS Data Buoys Successfully Refurbished  

Buoy on Dock

CariCOOS data buoys maintenance has been completed in record time. Commercial Divers Inc. removed buoys A, B and C from their moorings located respectively off Ponce, San Juan and St. John USVI, and re-deployed them following maintenance. Personnel from the University of Maine Physical Oceanography Group and CariCOOS refurbished all instruments and ground tackle and recertified the buoys for continued operation. CariCOOS data buoy E, slated for deployment in Vieques Sound later this year, was fitted with new instruments. Special thanks are extended to the Port of Ponce, the PR Ports Authority, and the West Indian Company in St. Thomas USVI for accommodating our buoy operations at their dock space.

 

CariCOOS data buoys are now prepared for another year of service; just in time for the 2013 hurricane season that officially begins June 1! 


May 2013

CariCOOS Buoys - San Juan, Ponce and Virgin Islands on Yearly Maintenance

We anticipate 2-3 weeks of downtime. Check www.caricoos.org

 


March 2013

Ocean Acidification and Temperature Article in La Regata Nautical Newspaper - click here

La Regatta Magazine

 


April 2013

CariCOOS Annual Stakeholder Meeting and Buoy Commissioning

Buoy recovered after being ripped from its mooring

Buoy recovered after being ripped from its mooring

The users of CariCOOS met to get an update on the progress of CariCOOS, see new products that had been developed, get a preview of what is coming in 2014, and commission the 4th coastal buoy.  Over 100 stakeholders gathered with the Caribbean as the backdrop of the meeting, where the 4th buoy will be deployed this summer.

80%; 1M; 10 and 5 hours

So what do these numbers represent?   The Buoys and Coastal Weather stations were up greater than 80% of the time, with 2 weather stations added this year for a total of 15.  CariCOOS data pages were accessed more than 1 million times this past year.  This includes pages viewed from both NOAA’s National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and the CariCOOS website.  Ten is the number of students and interns now with CariCOOS and this number has been growing steadily.  The energy and intellectual efforts they bring to CariCOOS is great to see.  These students spend 5 to 6 hours at a time aboard a jet ski, one of CariCOOS’ assets used to conduct bathymetric surveys.  The pre and post Hurricane Sandy surveys show that the loss of sand caused by coastal erosion during the storm was only temporary – a relief to the residents.

 

Miguel Canals in the forefront on the jet ski on the way to pick up the buoy

Miguel Canals in the forefront on the jet ski on the way to pick up the buoy

Recovery of the Wave buoy 

An accidental boat strike to the Datawell wave buoy ripped it from its mooring on March 8th.  US Army Corps Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) notified CaRA of the unattached buoy at 4:15pm. By 5pm, Miguel Canals had his jet ski that he uses to tow surfers out to large waves in the water and by 7pm, they had recovered the buoy and brought it back to shore to cheering surfers and fisherman.  CaRA will redeploy the buoy soon.

 

Significant Advances in Modeling

Under the leadership Dr. Miguel Canals, Dr. Stefano Leonardi, and Dr. Jorge Capella, the modeling effort delivered a number of products this year.  The operational wave model was up 99% of the time, which provides wave information at the beach and harbor scales.  The validation of the SWAN (wave model) shows significant improvement over previous versions of SWAN and the Wave Watch 3 model.  CaRA has developed regional current forecasts based on the Navy’s AMSEAS models and high resolution current forecasts in Virgin Islands and San Juan Bay.  Storm surge inundation maps have also been developed for the US Virgin Island and Puerto Rico and CaRA will work with the state emergency managers for publication.  They are also using the European Space Agency MERIS satellite imagery to evaluate suspended sediments and display them via web-based ESRI-ArcGIS interface for water management applications.

CariCOOS SWAN Multigrid Model Ver 2.0
CariCOOS SWAN Multigrid Model Ver 2.0

Reach Stakeholders

Miguel Canals in the forefront on the jet ski on the way to pick up the buoy

Zdenka, Director US IOOS Program and Dr. Yasmin Detres, CariCOOS Outreach and Education Coordinator

“The Coastal Climates of our Islands”, which was released last year in Spanish, was released in English this year.  While it is written for middle and high school student and meets state education standards, it is a popular download from CaRA’s website.  CaRA is working with the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary to improve Boaters Safety & Coastal Weather Literacy.  They have begun a “train the trainer program” with the USCG Auxiliary who then provide training classes to boaters on weather and coastal conditions.  This is augmented by YouTube videos which teach folks how to use the CaRA website.  For the last 2 years, CaRA has worked with NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) – Weather Camp, providing oceanographic class and at sea experiences.  On average there are 15 individuals per class and more than 45% of the students of this program stay in a sciences curriculum when they go to college.  CaRA will begin a student internship program for undergraduates this summer.  There are 2 slots available for this program and CaRA has received 30 applications.


 March 12, 2013

 

 

Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing

General Assembly

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Meeting Agenda Draft v3

 

Click here to view

 


Caribbean Regional Association for

Coastal Ocean Observing - CaRA

General Assembly

Tuesday March 12, 2013

Palmas del Mar Yacht Club and Marina

Humacao, Puerto Rico

 

The Stakeholders Council of the Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing (CaRA) is pleased to announce the celebration of its 2012 General Assembly to be held on Wednesday March 12 at the Palmas del Mar Yacht Club and Marina in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Please mark your calendars.

Commissioning of the new CariCOOS data buoy for Vieques Sound will be a highlight of the program. Vieques Sound hosts the largest recreational boating community of the islands. Consultations for this buoy emplacement have been held with recreational and state government stakeholders and with the US Coast Guard.

A further highlight of the program will be presentations on the part of visitors from sister regional association, MARACOOS (mid-Atlantic).

The General Assembly will begin at 9:00 AM. As customary, the Stakeholders Council will meet immediately following adjournment of the General Assembly.

We look forward to welcoming all CaRA members to the Assembly.

 

Venue: http://www.palmasdelmar.com/v2/amenitiesM.php

 

Suggested Lodging: http://www.wyndham.com/hotels/puerto-rico/humacao/wyndham-garden-at-palmas-del-mar/hotel-overview

 


February 5, 2013

Dr. Capella from CariCOOS in the Caribbean Conferences

The Institute of Caribbean Studies presents its latest cycle of Caribbean Conferences, Conferencias Caribeñas 12, for Spring 2013. All lectures will take place at the Manuel Maldonado Denis Amphitheatre in the Carmen Rivera de Alvarado Building (CRA 108), School of Social Sciences, University of Puerto Rico-Río Piedras. 

Dr. Jorge Capella  [CarlCOOS] will present “Las mareas y corrientes del Mar Caribe” (Tides and Currents in the Caribbean Sea) on February 14, 2013; 1:00–3:30pm


January 29, 2013

CariCOOS Summer Internship Opportunity

The Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS) is seeking two outstanding undergraduate students motivated for future graduate studies in oceanography, physics or engineering.
Research Areas: Interns will work with CariCOOS staff in areas related to the observing system mission at either the University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez campus or the Department of Marine Sciences Field Station located in La Parguera, Lajas, P.R. Students will receive a stipend of $2,000 for the eight weeks period.
Eligibility: Internship applicants must be current undergraduate students at the University of Puerto Rico and citizens or permanent residents of the United States. Students are encouraged to visit the CariCOOS.org website for additional information about the program.


December 10, 2012

Ocean Acidification Program News

Mesophotic coral reefs, ecosystems adapted to low-level illumination, are located between 30 to 150 m water depths. These ecosystems can be affected by waters with high CO2 content and therefore low pH coming from underwater masses as for instance, the Subtropical Under Water located at ~150 m depth and originated at the Sargasso Sea. Physical processes such as upwelling, eddies and internal waves can bring these waters to shallower depths affecting coral reef ecosystems and the benthic community. The CariCOOS program supports sustained occupation of the Caribbean Times Series Station (CaTS) off the south coast of Puerto Rico in order to characterize the physicochemical properties and evolution of core water masses in the northeastern Caribbean region. Periodical cruises to CaTS, the OSV EPA Bold cruise in November 2011 in waters to the south-west of PR, and the recent cruise R/V Bermuda Atlantic Explorer in October 2012 across the western tropical Atlantic Ocean from Puerto Rico to Bermuda have provided measurements of physical and chemical ocean properties to characterize vertical distribution and variability of the carbonate system.  - read more-

 


November 5, 2012

Council Member Normand Morel Passes Away

With deep sadness, we report the death of one our Council Members, Mr. Normand Morell who died last Wednesday, October 31. Normand, originally from the state of Rhode Island, came to the west coast of Puerto Rico and never left. He was a pillar and mainstay of the Club Deportivo del Oeste, an institution that he loved deeply and fought hard to bring to its current glory. Normand was always generous with his time and resources and was excited to be able to help advance ocean observing in the region through his membership on the Stakeholders Council of the Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing. He took on the CariCOOS/CSR high frequency radar antenna project as if it were his own.  He convinced the Board of Directors of the Club to allow our installations on their breakwater and was always ready to help us complete our antenna pattern tests aboard his beloved M/V Brass Balls. We at CaRA/CariCOOS will remember him fondly. May he rest in peace.


October 29, 2012

CariCOOS Boaters Guide Presentation to the South Coast Harbor Safety & Security Committee

 

One of the most recent CariCOOS education initiatives “CariCOOS-US Coast Guard Teamwork: improving boaters safety and coastal weather coastal weather literacy” was presented at the South Coast Harbor Safety & Security Committee meeting held on October 19, 2012 at La Parguera Yacht & Fishing Club.

 

Dr. Yasmin Detres, CariCOOS Education and Outreach Coordinator, described details of the partnership with the Cabo Rojo Flotilla of the USCG Auxiliary.  Since June 2012, the Cabo Rojo instructors participated of interactive workshops where CariCOOS experts provided the skills and capabilities to teach about real time and forecast products for coastal weather.  The second phase of this initiative is the development of the Puerto Rico’s Coastal Weather: Boaters Guide, a straightforward set of guidelines developed by CariCOOS to supplement the Boating Skills and Seamanship Marine Weather section in support of recreational boating safety.

 


October 29,2012

CariCOOS officially launches the CariCOOS Nearshore Wave Model

 

After two months of beta testing, CariCOOS has officially launched the CariCOOS Nearshore Wave Model (Version 2.0). The CariCOOS Nearshore Wave Model is a state of the art wave forecast system based on the Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) spectral wave model. The model's release comes just a few days before the CariCOOS region is expected to be affected by a strong swell event generated by Hurricane Sandy in the Northwest Atlantic.

 

Our model implementation provides forecasts for four nested regions: San Juan Bay, the Port of Ponce, a USVI grid centered on the Port of Charlotte Amalie, and a grid dedicated to Northwestern Puerto Rico. We also provide additional visualizations of the parent PR/ USVI grid output for the Mona Passage and the Northeast Corridor Reserve (NECR).

 

In addition to providing wave forecasts for the scientific, law enforcement and recreational community, among others, the model output is currently being used to develop a hazardous surfzone currents warning system for a research project sponsored by UPR Sea Grant. The development of the CariCOOS Nearshore Wave Model was carried out in collaboration with the San Juan office of the National Weather Service and was funded by NOAA IOOS and UPR Sea Grant.

 

Graphical output is now available at: http://caricoos.org/drupal/swan_multigrid

 


September 26, 2012

Conversan sobre erosiónErosion

Por Cristina Olán (cristina.olan@upr.edu)
Especial para PRENSA RUM

 
El sol, las olas y la arena constituyen valiosos recursos para la industria turística en las zonas tropicales. Sin embargo, la erosión puede perjudicar significativamente las costas. Tal es el caso de Rincón, litoral que se ha visto dramáticamente afectado por estos eventos que si bien forman parte del ciclo natural de la dinámica de las playas boricuas, también pueden verse acentuados por las actividades humanas.

Por tal razón, el Programa Sea Grant de la Universidad de Puerto Rico (PSGUPR), con sede en el Recinto Universitario de Mayagüez (RUM), llevó a cabo una rueda de discusión acerca de este problema en el también llamado Pueblo de los bellos atardeceres. Dueños de hospederías, operadores turísticos, científicos, jefes de agencia y líderes comunitarios asistieron a la actividad, que se celebró recientemente en el Hotel Rincón of the Seas.

El profesor Ruperto Chaparro, especialista en recreación y turismo, y director de Sea Grant, mostró a través de fotos, los cambios que han ocurrido en las playas de ese municipio y destacó el evento de erosión más reciente, acontecido el pasado mes de agosto, durante el paso del huracán Isaac, al sur de Puerto Rico. De igual forma, resaltó la importancia de las playas como atractivo turístico y recreativo, así como su valor económico y social.

Por su parte, el doctor Miguel Canals Silander, especialista en Ingeniería Costera, adscrito a la Facultad de Ingeniería del RUM, ofreció una visión científica de la situación. Su presentación mostró los resultados de estudios preliminares que, tanto él como estudiantes graduados y subgraduados, han obtenido con relación a la hidrodinámica y al transporte de sedimentos en las playas de Rincón.

Los hallazgos de su investigación explican parte de los cambios morfológicos de las playas del mencionado pueblo. El científico examinó el perfil de las playas a lo largo del tiempo, la batimetría (estudio del fondo marino), la dirección y la velocidad de las corrientes y de las olas, la composición del sedimento y las medidas obtenidas a partir de los datos de la boya del Sistema de Observación Oceánica del Caribe (CariCOOS). Asimismo, se consideran las estructuras costeras, tales como las paredes verticales, que fueron construidas para proteger las edificaciones pero, desafortunadamente, han contribuido a la erosión costera.

Canals Silander, indicó que, a pesar de los estudios que ya se han realizado, se necesitan otros y que se designen fondos para profundizar en los detalles del problema de erosión en esa región. Además, destacó la complejidad de estos procesos puesto que sucede en las costas irregularmente y a largo plazo.

“La erosión episódica responde a los procesos normales de erosión y acrecentamiento mediante los cuales, la playa pierde y recupera arena y alcanza su perfil de equilibrio. Por otro lado, la que ocurre a largo plazo, es más lenta y gradual, y se ve afectada por la erosión episódica y por factores tales como huracanes y estructuras costeras”, explicó el profesor al señalar que el RUM, a través del Departamento de Ingeniería, del Programa Sea Grant y de CariCOOS está trabajando en el desarrollo de un programa de Ingeniería costera.

Al final de la actividad, los presentes convinieron formar un comité que atienda la situación de la costa de Rincón y busque soluciones funcionales, en particular, para aquellos y aquellas que dependen económicamente del buen estado de las playas.

La autora es Coordinadora de comunicaciones del Programa Sea Grant de la Universidad de Puerto Rico.


Aug 29, 2012

Extreme Weather Event in CariCOOS Region

Tropical Storm Isaac passed through the CariCOOS region in late August approaching the south coast of the island of Puerto Rico, at its closest, at a distance of about ninety miles bringing strong winds and heavy swells. CariCOOS data buoy B, located off the south coast of the island recorded maximum wave height close to 21 feet and sustained significant wave heights of 12 feet. Wind gusts to 50 mph and sustained winds of about 30 mph were recorded in its passage across the eastern Caribbean on August 23.

The CariCOOS web page (http://www.caricoos.org) experienced a five-fold jump in hit rate. Over the period of August 21 – 27, more than one thousand unique visitors accessed the page for a total of more than ten thousand page views.

Prior to the storm, CariCOOS personnel provided advice to officials from the PR Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER) concerning the safety of their fleet and removal their boats from the water in preparation for the storm. Extreme erosion occurred in the wake of Isaac in the municipality of Rincon. CariCOOS personnel are currently conducting a rapid response bathymetric survey to understand the fate of the beach sand removed during the storm.


 

July 10, 2012

The Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2012: Building Knowledge in Tropical Meteorology, Atmospheric Sciences, and Oceanography

 
Motivated by the desire to broaden and increase exposure of students to techniques, research, academic programs and career opportunities in atmospheric sciences, meteorology and oceanography CarICOOS co-sponsored with the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences the Puerto Rico Weather Camp 2012. Fifteen high school students from Puerto Rico, St. Thomas (USVI) and Milwaukee (WI), participated in this immersive summer experience held at Isla Magueyes from June 24 – 30, 2012. Campers participated in workshops, interactive activities and trips to learn about diverse topics including the complex tropical weather and climate phenomena, the atmosphere and ocean connections, the impact of climate change in the Caribbean, atmospheric research, tools for ocean observation, and many others. CariCOOS training at-sea comprised the deployment of oceanographic instruments and visits to the NOAA PMEL CO2 and the NOAA ICON-CREWS buoys. In addition, students participated of an interactive workshop on CariCOOS waves, wind and currents graphical products, and a coastal marine ecosystems field trip to demonstrate the connectivity between weather and coastal ecosystems. Participants interacted with experts in various fields, university professors, graduate students, National Weather Service forecasters and administrators, and weather broadcasters, among other professionals. Yasmín Detrés, CariCOOS Education and Outreach Coordinator, has organized this summer program since 2007

 


 
  NWS  Dr. Corredor

 GIS Camp  CariCOOS Camp

 GS camp  RV Sultana

  


June 12, 2012

First CariCOOS- USCG Auxiliary Workshop on Coastal Weather Products

Flotilla 1-8 Instructors of the Cabo Rojo USCG Auxiliary attended the First CariCOOS Coastal Weather Products Workshop held on June 6, 2012 at the CariCOOS Isla Magueyes facilities. By participating in an interactive group activity, the instructors became familiar with the real time and forecast products for winds, waves and currents generated by the NWS and CariCOOS. This workshop represents the first step towards CariCOOS-USCG Auxiliary teamwork to develop an experimental Coastal Weather Module that will supplement the Boating Skills and Seamanship course in support of recreational boating safety.

 CariCOOS WorkshopCariCOOS Workshop

 CariCOOS Display


June 4, 2012

CariCOOS Virgin Islands Buoy  refurbished and Functioning

CariCOOS Virgin Islands buoy VI-1, moored south of St. John since April 2011, was out of the water for overhaul and upgrade two weeks ago. Seen below on the dock of the West Indian Company (WICO) the buoy was refurbished by two of its fabricators from the University of Maine, Neil Fisher (right) and Patrick Fikes (left). WICO provided accommodations for the reconditioning at its busy cruise ship dock through Dockmaster Mark Sabino (center), who is also a CaRA Stakeholders' Council member. At the same time, CaRA's San Juan buoy was also being overhauled by other members of the University of Maine team. With the buoy returned to station (Latitude 18° 14.93 ́N, Longitude 64° 45.74 ́W), its Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler could resume measuring currents and its Conductivity-Temperature-Depth instrument could go on measuring salinity, temperature, pressure and more. These measurements, along with wind speed, air temperature and other variables could again be monitored and processed for webpage access (http://www.caricoos.org/drupal/virgin_islands). CaRA reminds ocean-oriented Virgin Islanders that it would like to know how they use this buoy's observations and what improvements could make it more useful. Make contact and obtain more information about CaRA through its website

http://cara.uprm.edu.

  

 

 

 

 

 


June 4, 2012

 CariCOOS to Provide Official Forecast for International Surfing Day Paddleboard Race in La Parguera

CariCOOS will provide weather forecasting products for the La Parguera Benefit Paddleboard Race in 7 day, 3 day, and 1 day conditions forecasts. This will be a great resource for the competitors to prepare for the potentially challenging and shifty conditions they may face while navigating the Cayos of La Parguera.

The surfing and SUP community from around Puerto Rico are invited to participate in the island's International Surfing Day 2012 event being held as a paddleboard race at Aleli Tours in La Parguera, Puerto Rico, on June 23rd, at 9 am. This event is being organized by the Surfing Federation of Puerto Rico and the Rincon chapter of the Surfrider Foundation to raise funds to help protect Puerto Rico's oceans, waves, beaches, and reefs for the enjoyment of all people through conservation, activism, research, and education.

  

 Surfrider CariCOOS

 


June 4, 2012

CariCOOS Data Buoys Successfully Refurbished                           

  CariCOOS data buoys A, B and C, located respectively off Ponce, PR, San Juan, PR and St. John USVI were successfully removed from their moorings, transported to land, refurbished and redeployed over the month of May. The last buoy (buoy B) was redeployed June 4. A team of specialist from the University of Maine Physical Oceanography Group removed and replaced oceanographic instruments, refurbished the anemometers and reinitialized buoy functions. CariCOOS data buoy A, which had been offline since January, was restored to service. An independent contractor, Commercial Divers, was chosen to perform the buoy recoveries and redeployments. CariCOOS data buoys are now prepared for another year of service; just in time for the 2012 hurricane season that officially began June 1.

 

CariCOOS/CaRA


May 23, 2012

Memorandum of Understanding signed between National Weather Service and CariCOOS

The San Juan Weather Forecast Office of the National Weather Service and CariCOOS have formalized this week a Memorandum of Understanding providing the formal framework required for further development of collaborative efforts currently underway. Such collaboration has already proved successful in addressing the most pressing stakeholder need in our region: accurate and timely information on coastal weather conditions and enhanced forecasting capabilities.  CariCOOS activities envisioned under this agreement include a) maintenance of existing observational data streams and continued efforts to provide for additional critical data and product needs b) support to WFO-San Juan numerical modeling by providing model skill assessments, computational resources and operational redundancy c) fostering professional exchange towards sustaining forefront analytical and numerical simulation capabilities in the region. (5/23/2012)

 


May 01, 2012

CariCOOS buoys undergoing yearly maintenance

Users of CariCOOS buoy data will find that data is unavailable during this month. All three data buoys (PR1 - Ponce, PR2 - San Juan and VI1 – St. John, USVI) will be removed from the water, refurbished and re-deployed during the course of the month.  Personnel from the Physical Oceanography Group at the University of Maine, our prime buoy partner, will travel to the region to work on the buoys. Meanwhile, as of May 7, 2012 Commercial Diver Inc., our buoy contractor has commenced removal of the buoys.

CariCOOS is aware of the needs for buoy data and every effort will be made to reduce buoy downtime.

 


 

              Coastal Weather Education

Modulo de Climas Costeros

Available for download (.pdf)   Climas Costeros de Nuestras Islas, in order to know those factors that affect the marine coastal climate, and how their interaction affect the activities we wished to carry out in the coastal zone. 


Continously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network

COCONet will consist of 50 newly constructed continuously operating GPS/weather stations integrated with 50 existing GPS stations operated by partner organizations. COCONet will provide free, high-quality, open-format GPS and meteorological data for these stations via the internet for use by scientists, government agencies, educators, students, and the private sector. These data will be used by local and foreign researchers to study solid earth processes such as tectonic plate motions, tectonic plate boundary interaction and deformation, including earthquake cycle processes and risks. They will also serve atmospheric scientists and weather forecasting groups by providing more precise estimates of tropospheric water vapor and enabling better forecasting of the dynamics of airborne moisture associated with the yearly Caribbean hurricane cycle. Temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and rainfall data will be collected at each site using an advanced, very compact weather station. Local land surveyors, Government Agencies, NGOs and Humanitarian groups will also be able to benefit from improved weather data and a modern, highly accurate land survey reference frame.

 


 Large Amplitude Tide - May 2012

 

A lunar perigee-syzygy event will occur on May 6, 2012.  Every 28 days the moon is closest to the Earth during its orbital perigee.  Syzygy occurs when the Earth, the moon and the sun are in alignment during either new or full moon.  These two astronomical events coincide approximately twice a year but on different dates each year, causing perigee-syzygy tides.  During a syzygy we have spring tides while during a perigee-syzygy we observe king tides.

During the Full Moon on May 6 the perigee and syzygy will happen exactly at the same moment, which is not common, plus the moon will be in it's location closest to the Earth during 2012. In addition, the lunar declination will be very favorable for tides in PR.  In April the components started to come into alignment and we saw a good tide starting on April 7th.  The tide on May 6 will be of greater amplitude; probably the largest amplitude tide in 2012. At this time of the year generally a strong oscillating wave, or “seiching ” does not become excited on the south shelf like in autumn. We will see.

The low tide on May 6 will occur at around noon along the south coast of PR and at 2pm along the north coast.  Similarly low tides have in the past been confused with the early stages of a tsunami.   May 6 falls on a Sunday so many beach goers will be wondering as to the cause of the low sea level.  This phenomenon will extend over several days starting on May 6; each day the low tide will occur at a slightly later time, about 30 minutes to an hour depending on the site.  The accompanying high tides will create high sea levels around midnight on these dates

San Juan Tide ChartTide Graph Prediction for Parguera

 

 


 Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing

General Assembly

 Wednesday, March 21, 2012

 Meeting Agenda 

 

9:00 AM          Registration
 
10:00 AM        Introductory remarks:
Dr. Jorge E. Corredor
CaRA Council Chairman, Associate Director CariCOOS
Dr. Juan López-Garriga
Dean UPRM Art & Sciences Faculty
Dr. Walter Silva
Director UPRM Research & Development Center
Hon. Barbara Peterson
Administrator St. Thomas USVI
Mr. Ernesto Díaz
Director PR CZMP/DNRE
Capt. Drew Pearson
Commander USCG Sector San Juan
 
10:15 AM        Director’s Welcome and Executive Report
Prof. Julio Morell,Executive Director CaRA/CariCOOS
 
10:30 AM        IOOS update – Gabrielle Canonico IOOS
 
10:45 AM        Presentation of CariCOOS – NWS MOA
                        Prof. Julio Morell, Executive Director CaRA/CariCOOS
 and
Mr. Gary Votaw MIC NWS San Juan WFO
 
11:00 AM        COFFEE BREAK
POSTERS and EXHIBITS
 
11:30 AM        CariCOOS observations and models: current state and system perspectives 
Dr. Miguel Canals, Associate Director CariCOOS
11:45 AM        CariCOOS Data Management and Communications:
Dr. Jorge Capella
12:00 M           EcoExploratorio de PR
Ms. Ada Monzón, M.Sc.                   
                                                           
12:15 PM        CaRA VI Updates on Modeling and Outreach
                        Dr. Nasseer Idrisi / Prof. Roy A. Watlington
12:30 PM        CariCOOS Outreach and Education
Dr. Yasmín Detrés, O&E Coordinator
·         “Clima Costero de Nuestras Islas” - Educational Module 
·         Web page tutorials
·         Summer Camp
·         Other education & outreach activities
 
12:45 PM        WeatherFlow and CariCOOS
 Mr. Jay Titlow, Dr. Luis Aponte
 
 1:00 PM        Working Lunch
                        POSTER and EXHIBITS
 
 2:15 PM        CaRA Stakeholders Council Business Meeting
Dr. Jorge Corredor, Chairman
 
Certification criteria – Lic. Francis Torres, CaRA Legal Counsel
 
 3:30 PM        COFFEE BREAK
                        POSTERS and EXHIBITS
 
 3:45 PM        International Affairs
a.    CARICOM – Eugenio Piñero
b.    IOCARIBE – Aurelio Mercado
 
Date and venue for next GA
 
 4:30 PM         Adjourn

 

 

 


 

 

Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing - CaRA

General Assembly

March 21, 2012. Parguera, PR

 

 

CaRA will be holding its General Assembly on March 21 2012 in La Parguera, Lajas on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. Please mark your calendars for this important event. At the event, the CariCOOS team will be presenting an update on its achievements and workscope including a nearshore forecast system for Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands in support of port and harbor operations, and beach hazard program products.  Moreover, the finalized edition of the CariCOOS coastal weather educational module, developed in collaboration with Editorial NORMA, will be presented.

As the observing system matures, we are beginning to see increased use of our data and data products. We will be discussing metrics of data use through our own web pages and through other sources such as the National Data Buoys Center (NDBC) and through our partners and WeatherFlow and University of Maine.

This is the first time the General Assembly is held near our main CariCOOS facilities located on Isla Magueyes in La Parguera. For persons arriving in La Parguera on the day previous to the assembly, we will be hosting an open house at the CaRA/CariCOOS facilities.

CaRA/CariCOOS continues to be dependent on the guidelines and requirements set forth by the IOOS Ocean Observing Act of 2009. We will be providing an update on this process and will be consulting with stakeholders and legal counsel on this issue.

As in previous years, we plan to hold our Stakeholder Council meeting immediately following the GA.

We look forward to greeting all stakeholders at the Assembly.

Jorge E. Corredor, Chairman

CaRA Stakeholders Council

 


South Coast harbor Safety & Security Commitee Meeting:

 January 2012

The Caribbean Regional Integrated Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS) is pleased to invite you to attend the next SCHS&SC meeting scheduled for Friday, January 13, 2012 from 09:00 to 13:00 at Hotel Villa Parguera in La Parguera.

The meeting in January will serve as the transition from Coast Guard leadership of the SCHS&SC to stakeholder leadership. Although the Coast Guard will continue its role of supporting the SCHS&SC through participation in the proceedings and development of presentations, committee affairs will be in the hands of stakeholder-elected officers. Accordingly, during the meeting, in addition to the normal presentations, we expect to develop a SCHSSC charter and bylaws and to hold elections of SCHS&SC officers. We encourage you and your organization to consider an active role in the Committee and to be prepared to lend your support, and possible candidacy for a leadership position at the meeting next month.

To aid in the process of establishing the new SCHS&SC, we will be circulating a skeleton draft of bylaws prepared in consultation with the USCG and patterned after those of other regional HS&SC’s. We will request your input with considerations particular to our region.  

With very best wishes for the holiday season,

Jorge Corredor, M.Sc., Ph.D.
CariCOOS Associate Director
CaRA Council Chairman
jorge.corredor@upr.edu

Attachments:

Meeting Agenda

Bylaws Draft


 


CariCOOS 10-year buildout plan: Summary of survey results

 

“CariCOOS” is the Caribbean Coastal Ocean Observing System engaged in ocean observations in the US Caribbean Region including Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.  In order to gather stakeholder input for the development of a 10-year buildout plan, CariCOOS management posted a detailed survey of data users, their data needs and their patterns of data use.  To 1 October 2011, ninety-seven persons participated in the CariCOOS survey. Seventy seven respondents chose the English version and twenty used the Spanish version. A good cross-section of societal stakeholder sectors was achieved. Although most respondents (43) chose to do so in their individual capacity, seventeen identified themselves as government officials; twenty three were academics and ten were from commercial firms. Four journalists rounded out the pool.

Respondents overwhelmingly confirmed priority needs for data on winds, waves and currents. These needs have been consistently granted high priority by CariCOOS stakeholders since 2007 when the first surveys were preformed. Respondents also noted their use of the CariCOOS web page to access NWS wind, wave and sea level forecasts. Only 4 respondents reported a need for AIS data from ships in transit. Most respondents reported daily or weekly access to the CariCOOS web page; only about 30% reported monthly visit to the page.

Marine Operations

Over 70% of respondents identified recreational activities as the activity closest to their interests thus denoting the strength of this sector in the local economies. However, twenty respondents identified themselves as engaged in the field of marine safety/emergency management/search & rescue. Respondents in this section overwhelmingly agreed on the need for better geographic coverage of wind wave and current data. Specific gaps identified included Vieques Sound, the Virgin Passage and the North coast of PR. 

Water Quality and Ecosystem Health and Fisheries

Most respondents to this section (about 70%) identified themselves as individual users. Thirty respondents classified themselves as academic and eighteen were environmental managers. The single most important variable identified by these users was temperature followed by turbidity/visibility. More that 50% of respondents remarked on the need for more data on sewage contamination.  Ocean currents were deemed the most important data variable for fisheries management while coral bleaching and sedimentation were the most important variables for ecosystem health.

Climate Variability

Respondents to the section on climate variability were most concerned by the prospects for increased sea level and increased storm activity and considered seawater temperature to be the most important data in regards to the latter. The issue of ocean acidification was of minor concern to respondents denoting the general lack of knowledge regarding this process.

Coastal Hazards

Individuals and academics were the most numerous respondents to this section followed by emergency managers and security personnel (36%). Sixteen respondents identified themselves as coastal developers, eleven as belonging to planning agencies and four to the insurance industry. Over 85% of these respondents identified inundation forecasts as the most needed data in this category.

 


 

CariCOOS -Dr. Stefano Leonardi joins CariCOOS

Dr. Stefano Leonardi has accepted the task of helping with regional
and local ocean circulation modeling in 3D using HYCOM / ROMS.This new
effort will complement the ADCIRC single-layer circulation model
implemented by Juan Gonzalez, a former CaRA intern who is now
completing his PhD at Notre Dame University.

Stefano Leonardi got a Master degree in Aeronautical Engineering
(1999) and a PhD in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (2002) at the
University of Rome "La Sapienza", Italy. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow
up to 2006 during which he had research visitor appointments at the
University of Newcastle Australia, University of Southampton, Centre
of Excellence for Computational Mechanics Politecnico Bari, Institute
of Oceanography SCRIPPS San Diego and University of Washington
Seattle.

In April 2006 he organized the European Drag Reduction and Flow
Control meeting in Ischia Italy

In July 2006 he joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the
University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez as Assistant Professor. From
2007-2010 he was also Adjunct Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic
Institute Troy New York. He was awarded Distinguished Professor,
Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Puerto Rico at
Mayaguez in the academic years 2006-2007 and 2007-2008. In July 2009
he was key note speaker at the IUTAM Symposium on "The Physics of
Wall-bounded Turbulent Flows on Rough Walls" Cambridge UK.
He has published more than 20 journal papers, one being among the 10
most cited papers in the last two years on Journal of Fluid Mechanics.
He has also published more than 50 conference proceedings.

 Dr. Stefano Leonardi Curriculum vitae

 


 

CariCOOS - Summer Education & Outreach

This summer promises to be an exciting one for the CarICOOS program. Together with the
NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS), CariCOOS will co-sponsor the Puerto Rico
Weather Camp 2011 from July 10 to 16. Fifteen high school students from public and private
schools around the island will participate in this immersive summer experience. Through
seminars, workshops, field trips, training at-sea and, interactive activities, students will learn
about our complex tropical weather, climate change, atmosphere and ocean connections,
coastal weather, and ocean observing systems. During this period, participants will have the
chance to meet experts in the field and learn about the diverse career opportunities.

On July 23rd CariCOOS will host a visit of the 14th Annual National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB®)
award winning team. The winners, from Marshfield High School (Marshfield, Wisconsin),
received all expense paid trip awards to experience ocean sciences in Puerto Rico. During their
visit to CaRA/CariCOOS facilities, our staff will offer an interactive workshop on IOOS products
and tools. The NOSB is an ocean science education program of the Consortium for Ocean
Leadership based in Washington, DC.



April 2011

CARICOOS DATA BUOY C NOW SERVING THE US VIRGIN ISLANDS

In further implementation of the CariCOOS Data Buoy network, Data Buoy C, the third of the array, was successfully launched on April 15 2011 on the USVI insular shelf at a point about 7 nautical miles south of Rendezvous Bay, St. John. Extensive consultations were undertaken by USVI CaRA personnel and members of the CaRA stakeholder Council in order to assure optimal value to the data users. This location will serve a multitude of stakeholders including natural resource managers, recreational divers, and sailors, and cruise ship, ferry and port operators. Prior to the actual launching, a commissioning ceremony was held on the docks of the West Indian Company, attended, among others, by the Governor of the USVI and the President of the University of the Virgin Islands.  The buoy, a sister to buoys A and B in waters of Puerto Rico, is expected to perform unattended for a period of 1 year after which it will be recovered, refurbished and redeployed. Data from CariCOOS Data Buoy C is posted in this web site, updated hourly and provided free to all interested stakeholders.

Left to right: Dr. LaVerne Ragster, Prof. Julio M. Morell, Capt. Marjorie Smith, Capt. Mark Sabino, Dr. Jorge E. Corredor, Governor John P. De Jongh, IOOS Director Zdenka Willis, Dr. Nasseer Idrisi

 


 CariCOOS MANAMGEMENT DELIVERS PRODUCTS AND SERVICES AT GENERAL ASSEMBLY

The third General Assembly of the Caribbean Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing (CaRA) was celebrated on April 12 at the Rincon of the Seas Beach Resort on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Eighty five registered participants attended and five new signatories subscribed to the CaRA MOA and were welcomed to the Association. A strong delegation arrived by charter plane from the US Virgin Islands.  Highlights of the meeting included an address to CaRA members by Zdenka Willis, Director of the IOOS Office, protocolary commissioning of a wave buoy for deployment of the coast of Rincón and formal delivery of CaRA products including educational materials, inundation products and validated model outputs. Current officers of the Regional Association were re-elected for new terms and new members of the Stakeholder’s Council were elected. A brief meeting of the council was held after adjournment of the General Assembly. Draft minutes of both meetings have been posted in the web site.
  


WAVE MEASURING BUOY AT RINCON PUERTO RICO

The Caribbean Association for Coastal Ocean Observing - CaRA, through its Caribbean Regional Coastal Ocean Observing System (CariCOOS by its acronym in English) has installed a wave buoy in the vicinity of Punta Higuero in Rincon. This is the first buoy in Puerto Rico dedicated to wave measurement and the third of the island in terms of coastal ocean data. The wave buoy will increase the safety of boaters and other users of the coastal marine environment through the dissemination of real time data, help characterize the year-round wave climate on the shores of Rincon, help scientists and engineers understand the erosion process that is so seriously affecting the Rincon coastline and enhance the recreational experience by allowing real time monitoring of the waves at Rincon by tourists and recreational users.
This Datawell ® Directional Waverider ® Buoy is the most sophisticated and accurate wave measurement buoy commercially available. It will measure properties such as size, direction and wave period, water temperature, and the instantaneous sea-level rise and will transmit this data every half hour. This small (90 cm in diameter) buoy located at 18 ° 22,726 'N, 67 ° 16,800' W in a  depth of 102 feet (31 meters) is located about 1 nautical mile off Punta Higuero. Prior to the buoy deployment, a short commissioning ceremony was held in conjunction with the annual CaRA General Assembly held at the Rincon of the Seas Beach Resort on April 12 2011.

Image: Wave Buoy location by Google Map

 


Earth Observation Support for Sustainable Tourism in Small Island States
March 9-11, 2011, San Juan Puerto Rico

The Third Regional Workshop in the Workshop Series of the GEO Coastal Zone Community of Practice (CZCP) focused on the Caribbean and was organized in partnership with the Caribbean Regional Association (CaRA) for the Caribbean Integrated Coastal Ocean Observing System (CarICOOS), the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS), the United Nation Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC).

The Third Regional Workshop of the series focused on the specific needs, challenges and capabilities related to sustainable tourism in the small island states of the Caribbean. The workshop brought together stakeholders in island tourism with Earth observation and service providers in order to investigate how Earth observation-based services could support decision making related to all facets of tourism and enable operational and planning practices for sustainable tourism.

A full report and details of the Workshop can be found at:

http://www.czcp.org/workshops/Puerto_Rico/